Counterpoints Arts
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Events

North West
20 March 2017  -  20 March 2017

Brexit, Migration and Communities

First Person Women

Learning Lab: Brexit, Migration and Communities – A Call to Creative Action

HOME, 2, Tony Wilson Place, First St, Manchester M15 4FN

10.30am-5pm: Networking event

Price: £3 Platforma members / £7 non-Platforma members

Booking: If you would like to attend please email: Katherine@can.uk.com

Learning Lab engages the Platforma North West Hub, but also seeks to include artists, cultural workers, organisations, activists, academics and change-makers interested in forging alliances through working together.

It will mix lively debate, share ways of cooperative working and learn from active case studies from different regions.

Learning Lab is shaped by the following provocations:

What role does art and culture play in a post-referendum landscape?

How can arts and culture engage with communities experiencing the harsh reality of austerity policies?

Can arts and culture bring communities together in a time of increasing political and social division?

How might the arts tap into the deep resilience of communities?

How can arts and culture inspire communities to build capacity, respond to ongoing challenges and define their own futures?

Learning Lab partners include: Community Arts North West (CAN), Counterpoints Arts and the University of York, Northern Migration Network.

Film

6pm-8.30pm: Film Screening / Post screening Q&A

The Stuart Hall Project

Synopsis:

Highly acclaimed at the 2013 Sundance and Sheffield Documentary Festivals, this film from award-winning documentarian John Akomfrah (The Nine Muses) is a sensitive, emotionally charged portrait of cultural theorist Stuart Hall. A founding figure of contemporary cultural studies and one of the most inspiring voices of the post-war Left, Stuart Hall’s resounding and ongoing influence on British intellectual life commenced soon after he emigrated from Jamaica in 1951. Combining extensive archival imagery – television excerpts, home movies, family photos – with specially filmed material and a personally mixed Miles Davis soundtrack, Akomfrah’s filmmaking approach matches the agility of Hall’s intellect, its intimate play with memory, identity and scholarly impulse traversing the changing historical landscape of the second half of the 20th century. (BFI)

The film will be followed by a post screening panel and open discussion.